Over more than a century, we’ve accepted 406 doctoral dissertations on issues confronting every major philosophical discipline and every major figure in the history of philosophy.

Whatever your area of expertise or interest in philosophy, you will find here one of the richest and stimulating intellectual environments for you to continue your work. Here you will find the Catholic intellectual tradition embodied in a supportive yet challenging faculty with an abiding concern for the relation between faith and reason, the intelligibility of nature, the reality of organic form or soul, the inquiry into causal hierarchies, and the possibility of an ethics and political philosophy based on rational insight into human nature.

You will work against the background of a broad consensus on the definitive importance of two perennial questions: What is the human good? What are the ultimate principles of being and knowledge?

Prospects for Doctors of Philosophy

The majority of our Ph.D. graduates have gone on to tenure-track or permanent positions at the post-secondary level, in the U.S. and abroad. Of those who have not, some have chosen to engage in work outside of academia (e.g., in medicine, in music, as a member of a religious order), and many other fields. Thus, graduates of our program who engage in unrestricted job searches have excellent chances of finding a position teaching philosophy in a college or university. Most do so in four-year Catholic colleges or seminaries; some do so in Ph.D. granting institutions or non-Catholic colleges.

Requirements

  • Reading knowledge of both French and German as a prerequisite requirement.
  • A minimum of 60 credit hours (including work completed for the M.A. degree).
  • Completion of faculty-approved dissertation.
  • Final oral examination in the form of dissertation defense.